Archives For transformation

To understand darkness we must know light, to value pleasure we must also known pain.  Yet when we suffer we feel it is a signal that something is wrong in our life, something needs to be changed or healed.

We only suffer because the mind notices incongruence in what we desire and what we are experiencing.  It thinks about the pain of not having what we want, stews on it and torments us with it.  Webster’s Dictionary defines this dependency, “suffering implies conscious endurance of pain or distress.”  If our mind doesn’t know the pain, we don’t suffer, hence laughing gas at the dentist office.

The human mind can suffer over very abstract subjects, such as not knowing one’s purpose, relationships that aren’t as we would hope them to be, regrets, not feeling clear about what path to take, not feeling connected to others in a fulfilling way, worry, feeling powerless, not knowing what the future will bring, feeling stuck or stagnant in our life.  Suffering takes the emotional forms of anxiety, unhappiness, tension, inner-conflict, fear, grief and depression.

“A cold in the head causes less suffering than an idea.”                 Jules Renard

Everyone I work with as a clairvoyant desires relief from some level of suffering.  Externally it may look like the suffering is an experience of the physical body, like it is being caused by someone in their lives, some condition they must tolerate or the lack of an answer to an elusive question. But the real source of suffering is what the mind does with the emotions these physical and circumstantial experiences evoke.  To relieve suffering we must go to its source, the belief system.

When we love someone and can’t be with them because either they don’t feel the same about us or circumstances keep us a part, our heart feels broken, disappointed and longs for the connection of their company.  It is our belief about it that causes us suffering. Usually it’s something like our life will not be as good without this particular person or we will never feel love again.  Our mind notices that pain and wants relief.  It may seek relief through the company of another lover, a bottle of wine or self-critical thoughts that shut down the feelings. 

The intuitive mind senses and responds to emotions while the analytical mind calculates questions and tries to “figure them out.”  When we can’t figure it out we suffer.  The analytical mind spins and we have no place to go but the sense that something is wrong because we can’t see a solution that relieves our pain.  The analytical mind processes the painful emotions and physical sensations seeking relief in the form of an answer.  If there is no formula to make our pain go away, which is the case with emotional distress, the mind suffers over its own suffering, compounding the sensation that something is wrong.

Our subconscious beliefs about what to expect from our experiences, other people or life in general, live in our blind spot and create the greatest suffering.  Some are inherited in our DNA, others are acquired from experiences. All are written in the book of our soul, the Akashic records

To release the mind from suffering we must shift false and outdated beliefs. This goes beyond psychology to soul level transformation.  It often requires the help of someone who can see and heal our subconscious blind spot.  What we can do for ourselves is practice stilling the analytical mind through meditation or intentional body movement (yoga, walking outdoors, dance, breath work etc).  Stopping the mind from its obsessive search for answers to emotional experiences provides healthy relief of our suffering.  When we meditate regularly it breaks the cycle of unproductive mental activity, setting us free and bringing greater peace.

To understand darkness we must know light, to value pleasure we must also known pain.  Yet when we suffer we feel it is a signal that something is wrong in our life, something needs to be changed or healed.

We only suffer because the mind notices incongruence in what we desire and what we are experiencing.  It thinks about the pain of not having what we want, stews on it and torments us with it.  Webster’s Dictionary defines this dependency, “suffering implies conscious endurance of pain or distress.”  If our mind doesn’t know the pain, we don’t suffer, hence laughing gas at the dentist office.

The human mind can suffer over very abstract subjects, such as not knowing one’s purpose, relationships that aren’t as we would hope them to be, regrets, not feeling clear about what path to take, not feeling connected to others in a fulfilling way, worry, feeling powerless, not knowing what the future will bring, feeling stuck or stagnant in our life.  Suffering takes the emotional forms of anxiety, unhappiness, tension, inner-conflict, fear, grief and depression.

“A cold in the head causes less suffering than an idea.”          Jules Renard

Everyone I work with as a clairvoyant desires relief from some level of suffering.  Externally it may look like the suffering is an experience of the physical body, like it is being caused by someone in their lives, some condition they must tolerate or the lack of an answer to an elusive question. But the real source of suffering is what the mind does with the emotions these physical and circumstantial experiences evoke.  To relieve suffering we must go to its source, the belief system.

When we love someone and can’t be with them because either they don’t feel the same about us or circumstances keep us a part, our heart feels broken, disappointed and longs for the connection of their company.  It is our belief about it that causes us suffering. Usually it’s something like our life will not be as good without this particular person or we will never feel love again.  Our mind notices that pain and wants relief.  It may seek relief through the company of another lover, a bottle of wine or self-critical thoughts that shut down the feelings. 

The intuitive mind senses and responds to emotions while the analytical mind calculates questions and tries to “figure them out.”  When we can’t figure it out we suffer.  The analytical mind spins and we have no place to go but the sense that something is wrong because we can’t see a solution that relieves our pain.  The analytical mind processes the painful emotions and physical sensations seeking relief in the form of an answer.  If there is no formula to make our pain go away, which is the case with emotional distress, the mind suffers over its own suffering, compounding the sensation that something is wrong.

Our subconscious beliefs about what to expect from our experiences, other people or life in general, live in our blind spot and create the greatest suffering.  Some are inherited in our DNA, others are acquired from experiences. All are written in the book of our soul, the Akashic records

To release the mind from suffering we must shift false and outdated beliefs. This goes beyond psychology to soul level transformation.  It often requires the help of someone who can see and heal our subconscious blind spot.  What we can do for ourselves is practice stilling the analytical mind through meditation or intentional body movement (yoga, walking outdoors, dance, breath work etc).  Stopping the mind from its obsessive search for answers to emotional experiences provides healthy relief of our suffering.  When we meditate regularly it breaks the cycle of unproductive mental activity, setting us free and bringing greater peace.

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Room For Good Energy

Natalie —  January 19, 2011 — Leave a comment
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Addictions form in response to the sensation of fulfillment or relief we experience when we consume a substance or take an action that allows us to escape less desirable feelings.  We can become addicted to regular things that in-and-of-themselves are not bad for us, such as thoughts, foods, beverages, shopping, reading, sex, sports or people.  When we engage in anything to avoid our depression, anger, fear or unhappiness, it locks in the negative energy preventing growth and flow.  We develop a compulsive physiological need for the relief it provides while it lets us stay stuck.

Intuitively sensitive people are more highly drawn to the escape of addiction simply because we feel so much of the energy around us.  Unlike tying our shoes or brushing our teeth, most of us weren’t taught how to manage our energetic boundaries. In fact it is rare if one’s awareness of energy is acknowledged and validated by society.  Without skills to create a sense of safety amidst the ocean of energy we feel, we are left to figure it out on our own.  As children we were aware of the energy around us at home, in school and everywhere we went.  The barrage of information was at times overwhelming, and may even have caused us to manifest physical symptoms.  At times our empathy and the desire to help others had us subconsciously take on their pain to help them heal. 

The intensity of this sensitivity often materializes with coping mechanisms such as suppression, denial or addictions that allow us to go “out of body” and avoid the response altogether.  As adults we have the opportunity to reclaim our personal power by validating the intuitive sensitivity we previously denied.  Through acknowledgment of our heightened inner barometer for the energy in our environment, we can learn to set our space and generate a healthy experience of that awareness.  We don’t have to shut down our intuitive guidance when we generate new boundaries.  Through regular visualization of our aura bubble at its appropriate size (three feet in every direction around the body), we limit the intrusion into our space of vacillating energy.  It helps to paint our aura a fresh color in our minds-eye (avoid white as it attracts spiritual entities).  A clear vision of our space allows us to reduce the ups-and-downs that are externally generated.  When we are only experiencing our own feelings rather than those of the people around us we feel more stable and we are less driven to the relief addiction temporarily provides.

Divine Provision

Natalie —  September 15, 2010 — Leave a comment
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Are You Being Bullied?

Natalie —  August 18, 2010 — Leave a comment
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Personal Transformation

Natalie —  June 16, 2010 — Leave a comment
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