Archives For earth

Last Friday at our family ranch, I stretched out on the grass in a cow pasture looking up at the pale blue sky.  Doing nothing but listening to the sounds of birds, bugs, gurgling water and a breeze gently blowing in the trees.  The moment of rest and nothingness penetrated my soul.  It dropped me into a place of awareness of all the distractions I’d been carrying in my body and mind from the psychic density of living in the city and the busyness of day-to-day activity.  It felt as if the earth instantly absorbed the entire disturbance that had been filling my mind and the tension in my body.

I found a deep inner-peace and gratitude for the beauty, raw ciaos and simplicity of plant and animal life.  It made me think of our human tendency to seek purpose.  In the desire to find some greater meaning in life, we believe the cultural programming that our purpose is outside of us, something we do, some function we fulfill in the world. 

Those things that make us feel joy tend to be attributed the label of our purpose: creative arts, music, writing, activities that have an element of service to others. We want to clearly see what our purpose is and we want it to be fixed, one thing for our entire lifetime.  When we experience purpose for awhile through some activity like being a parent, or working on a creative project, then that stage of our life comes to transition or completion; we feel a sense of meaninglessness or lack of purpose again.  The self questioning begins.  

We struggle with a desire to know our purpose and want a life focus that is guaranteed to give us a sense of fulfillment.  We are haunted with a subtle yet chronic dissatisfaction and sense of yearning, feeling unfulfilled, looking for this purpose outside of ourselves.  We decide that we are doing the wrong job or in the wrong relationship because we don’t feel satisfied.  We give our power to this concept of finding a purpose beyond simply living.  We feel disappointment and self-judgment that we haven’t figured it out yet. 

It appears from the outside that other people have figured it out.  We see the bright light of successful athletes, actors, writers, politicians, healers, musicians.  We believe that they have a sense of purpose and are at peace because they are living their dream.  Yet it is an illusion. Those in these positions that venture to reveal their humanity will confess they still question their purpose.

We have been sold a collective lie, a belief that if we discover something to do that is our purpose we will feel forever fulfilled and at peace.  But the source of fulfillment and inner-peace isn’t a job or a relationship; it’s in our approach to every day activity. 

While I sat in the pasture noticing the cattle grazing, birds soaring and little bugs foraging for food, I realized that they were at peace with simply eating, drinking, sleeping and creating a nest. They didn’t experience dissatisfaction.  There was no belief that something out in the future, some bit of insight or self-awareness that they hadn’t figured out yet was going to make them perpetually feel better.

A more satisfying focus of our energy, than this illusive question of purpose, is identifying what creates a sense of meaningfulness in our lives. Here are some possibilities to contemplate:

  • Connecting with others through conversation and touch
  • Creative expression and sharing our creations with others
  • Having interests that keep us curious to know more
  • Setting goals that are attainable
  • Teaching, parenting, learning, nurturing
  • Knowing we have friends to call on when in need
  • Spending time outdoors or creating a beautiful sanctuary in our home

The belief that we haven’t figured out or are not living our purpose, denies our power to create a meaningful life.  It leads us to focus on people or activities outside of ourselves that we think are to blame for our lack of satisfaction and to judge ourselves.  The deeper need behind the quest to find our life purpose is our desire for fulfillment.  Sustainable inner-peace comes from choosing what inspires, expands and energizes us day-to-day.

Positive Diversion

Natalie —  November 24, 2010 — Leave a comment

Our manifestations come from a state of feeling.  Ideally that emotional state is positive, pleasurable even blissful, fueling the future with love rather than fear.  This week I divert from my usual reflections to take you someplace juicy in your thoughts with the hope that it will feed a positive state of creation…

My Love Letter to the Deep Woods

Beloved your sweetness swallows me whole, fills my lungs and blood with tangy oxygen.  The sun draws last night’s mist from your soil, wrapping its arms around me.  I run freely within your wild undergrowth, my feet know your solid springy touch.  I see you and it delights me.  Monstrous fern and elderberry congregate beneath fir trees that reach up to touch the sky.  Fox gloves drip lavender spotted flowers, rising from your curved mountainside.   You receive me without judgment, whisper with honey breath through the delicate breeze of pale green moss dangling from your branches.  You’ve forgotten what season it is for a day and given me the gift of summer clarity, warmth and radiance in the midst of autumn’s slow death.  I rest my face against your meadows, trimmed low by deer grazing.  You hold me firmly as I sink into you, the perfect mattress of chocolate loam.  Your frog and meadowlark sing to me. The red dragonfly hovers.  I’m in love with you.  I’m not afraid to commit to you, my heart is open.  I trust you.  I feel your healing touch hold my hand.  You lead me to peace, a waterfall rushing from its source springs forth from deep within your core. We unite in naked appreciation for one another.

Moving Forward

Natalie —  July 2, 2010 — 7 Comments

At times I get stuck in a pattern of belief that my mind can derive the bottom-line truth in a given situation.  Yet my brain is just a measuring device for the sensory messages it receives from my body.  The body sends messages that are interpreted by the mind through the senses of sight, smell, touch, hearing and taste.  The mind takes these bits of information makes a conclusion, and then asks us to do something about it.  The spirit uses different points of reference to calculate the best way to move forward.  Our intuitive guidance system taps into a non-physical knowledge that can also lead us safely through life experiences. 

Last weekend I was climbing Mt Yale, a 14,000 foot summit in the Colorado Rocky Mountains.  Hiking at altitude creates sensations in my body that are interpreted by my brain as repetitive signals to “stop, turn back.”  The lack of oxygen and steep terrain challenge my lungs, muscles and circulatory system with forms of resistance that feel life threatening.  I hike at high-altitude to experience a sense of mind or over matter, to somehow prove my mind wrong by overriding its interpretations with a higher truth.  I know I can do it.  I know I will survive. 

On the ascent I can briefly distract my mind with the sight of aspen and pine trees, the sound of the gushing glacier-melt creek, the smell of wildflowers and conversations with my friend.  Yet the distraction is always temporary as my mind continues to want to regain control of the situation.  Hiking Mt Yale I was conscious of my spirit experiencing the hike.  When my body began to feel exhausted and my vision was a bit dulled, to the point where I didn’t see every rock on the trail, instead of feeling fearful that I would stumble, I noticed my spirit was guiding me.  I saw with clarity the parallel existence of how my mind interprets its experience beside how my spirit interprets the experience.  Both are equally capable of providing guidance that keeps me safe.  The difference is that when I’m listening to my spirit it is not concerned about reaching the summit or measuring the energy left in my physical body relative to what is required to get me to where I need to go.  My spirit is present in the moment.  My spirit says, “I am moving forward.  I will keep moving forward.  I want to move forward.”  

Mind-body measurement of our experience is 100% in the physical/material realm.  The challenge is that the mind does not know how to interpret intuitive information.  If the message it’s receiving from the body contradicts intuitive guidance the mind goes to battle with spirit and tries to override the spiritual knowing in an act of physical self-preservation.  The mind does not know how to interpret the emotional indicators beyond the physical sensations they generate, pain or pleasure. 

Next time you notice that your mental and spiritual guidance are in conflict, acknowledge both the indicators from your physical body experience and what you know intuitively.  Let this awareness of the source of data help break gridlock that can keep you stuck.  The mind is not the final truth.  It is one source of information available to you.  Intuition offers insight that can help us move forward when the mind is resistant.

In today’s world the analytical mind is king while trusting intuition is judged as emotional and subjective.   This cerebral approach to life attempts to figure things out and feel in control.  Recent natural and man-made disasters have drawn to our attention the reality that humans do not have control over planet Earth.  We can forecast the weather and volcanic eruptions, build dykes to protect us from tidal changes and use science to perform feats such as drilling for oil at great depths of the ocean, but this does not put us in control of the forces of nature.  As long as we are not personally impacted by a hurricane, tornado, earthquake or tsunami we are able to live in denial, believing that technology will save us from the realities of our environment.  Our belief in science has distracted us from true intuitive power that comes with alignment to the vibration of the Earth.

The human body is amazing in its capacity to understand and process an exceptional quantity of data.   We have unintentionally detached from our primal-sensory nature through educational programming that validates the analytical mind combined with the many conveniences science and technology provide.  Opportunities to touch the Earth and feel its pulse are not part of our daily lifestyle.  Because of this we’ve lost contact with a facet of our intuitive capacity, experiencing a sense of separation from Mother Nature.  When we take time to be in non-manmade environments we increase our access to inner guidance.  A hike, mountain bike ride or work in the garden, saturate the visual auditory and sensory facilities with a neutral form of energy.  Nature is chaotic and extremely organized in a material as well as spiritual sense.  This reminds us of the invisible aspects of our Self. 

By immersing in the Earth’s vibration we tune-in to a primal side of our human nature.  The aspect of our energy that can sense when lightening is about to strike, as the hair on our arms stands on end.  In the city we are swallowed up in a stream of news, whether it is fact, fiction or entertainment, it draws our attention away from our inner guidance.  It keeps our focus pointed externally rather than internally.  Mother Nature is the ultimate cleanser of psychic space.  Her wild wide-open spaces download the information inundation that has clogged our receptors with predominantly useless data.  The simple act of being in nature, regardless of the activity or inactivity of our body, can be an intentional form of meditation.  When we see a hawk, daisy or the bark on an aspen tree we presence ourselves to beauty, resilience and simplicity. 

The fire hose of data constantly inundating our life can be exhausting and overwhelming.  It makes us want to crawl back into our shell, tune-out, take a break.  The most vibrant place to take that break is in Mother Nature.  Connection to the Earth’s vibration helps us align to the part of ourselves that is chronically being overridden by an analytical minded environment.  Mother Nature offers us a healing of sensory overload and provides clearer access to our inner guidance.  Let us receive her gift.