Archives For analytical mind

The Magic of NOT Knowing

Natalie —  October 26, 2011 — 6 Comments

True creation requires stepping into undefined space where our question stays open, unknown.  When we latch onto an answer too soon we limit our potential to see.  We shut down the magic that comes from wonder and curiosity.  We engage the analytical mind without allowing space for our intuition.

This empty space full of potential “the void,” can only exist if we allow it to.  The void is an exceptionally challenging place to live.  It’s counter to our survival instinct, that wants to feel safe by having answers. Yet allowing space for the unknown is where we experience breakthroughs in awareness.

Breakthroughs are precious moments where our consciousness shifts and we see from a new perspective.  Unless forced by circumstances, most of us don’t intentionally make time in our lives for the creative void.  When life wants to get our attention, we find ourselves in a challenge that requires we wait, pause, slow down and NOT know.

Our analytical mind wants to have the answer and move on.   It gets frustrated by delay.  It is compelled to solve whatever dilemma or puzzle is before it.  It doesn’t like to be put on-hold while we allow ourselves to be in the unknown, waiting for new possibilities to be reveal.

Our intuitive mind has a more gentle approach.  It gives us signals, hints, opportunities to notice the contribution it can provide.  It doesn’t bark at us but calls to us.

The analytical mind harasses us for explanations, justification and evidence before we act on our intuition.  The  intuitive mind invites us to trust the creative zone of questions that have no pre-defined answer. It leads us, one awareness at a time, in a direction we might never have imagined, to places we never knew existed.

The magic of creation expands when we honor the gifts of both our capacity to look at what we experience with logic as well as trust our intuitive observations.  We are culturally taught to let the analytical mind direct our lives.  By doing so, we miss many opportunities to get out of a rut and onto a new path.  We repeat the same old annoying patterns in our lives.

To cultivate a juicier life, we can intentionally create spaces of NOT knowing.  Instead of jumping to the way we’ve always done it or repeating what we see others do, we pause in the void to allow room for a new creation.  It is uncomfortable to hold this undefined space. Yet it is critical to choose to NOT know long enough to deeply listen to our intuitive signals.  When we do, we hear spiritual direction that guides us on a path less predictable, more magical.

This blog post was inspired by a speech given by Ron Walters at a technology conference in Boise on the importance of boldness, curiosity and nothing/allowing space for the unknown in the design process.

To understand darkness we must know light, to value pleasure we must also known pain.  Yet when we suffer we feel it is a signal that something is wrong in our life, something needs to be changed or healed.

We only suffer because the mind notices incongruence in what we desire and what we are experiencing.  It thinks about the pain of not having what we want, stews on it and torments us with it.  Webster’s Dictionary defines this dependency, “suffering implies conscious endurance of pain or distress.”  If our mind doesn’t know the pain, we don’t suffer, hence laughing gas at the dentist office.

The human mind can suffer over very abstract subjects, such as not knowing one’s purpose, relationships that aren’t as we would hope them to be, regrets, not feeling clear about what path to take, not feeling connected to others in a fulfilling way, worry, feeling powerless, not knowing what the future will bring, feeling stuck or stagnant in our life.  Suffering takes the emotional forms of anxiety, unhappiness, tension, inner-conflict, fear, grief and depression.

“A cold in the head causes less suffering than an idea.”                 Jules Renard

Everyone I work with as a clairvoyant desires relief from some level of suffering.  Externally it may look like the suffering is an experience of the physical body, like it is being caused by someone in their lives, some condition they must tolerate or the lack of an answer to an elusive question. But the real source of suffering is what the mind does with the emotions these physical and circumstantial experiences evoke.  To relieve suffering we must go to its source, the belief system.

When we love someone and can’t be with them because either they don’t feel the same about us or circumstances keep us a part, our heart feels broken, disappointed and longs for the connection of their company.  It is our belief about it that causes us suffering. Usually it’s something like our life will not be as good without this particular person or we will never feel love again.  Our mind notices that pain and wants relief.  It may seek relief through the company of another lover, a bottle of wine or self-critical thoughts that shut down the feelings. 

The intuitive mind senses and responds to emotions while the analytical mind calculates questions and tries to “figure them out.”  When we can’t figure it out we suffer.  The analytical mind spins and we have no place to go but the sense that something is wrong because we can’t see a solution that relieves our pain.  The analytical mind processes the painful emotions and physical sensations seeking relief in the form of an answer.  If there is no formula to make our pain go away, which is the case with emotional distress, the mind suffers over its own suffering, compounding the sensation that something is wrong.

Our subconscious beliefs about what to expect from our experiences, other people or life in general, live in our blind spot and create the greatest suffering.  Some are inherited in our DNA, others are acquired from experiences. All are written in the book of our soul, the Akashic records

To release the mind from suffering we must shift false and outdated beliefs. This goes beyond psychology to soul level transformation.  It often requires the help of someone who can see and heal our subconscious blind spot.  What we can do for ourselves is practice stilling the analytical mind through meditation or intentional body movement (yoga, walking outdoors, dance, breath work etc).  Stopping the mind from its obsessive search for answers to emotional experiences provides healthy relief of our suffering.  When we meditate regularly it breaks the cycle of unproductive mental activity, setting us free and bringing greater peace.

To understand darkness we must know light, to value pleasure we must also known pain.  Yet when we suffer we feel it is a signal that something is wrong in our life, something needs to be changed or healed.

We only suffer because the mind notices incongruence in what we desire and what we are experiencing.  It thinks about the pain of not having what we want, stews on it and torments us with it.  Webster’s Dictionary defines this dependency, “suffering implies conscious endurance of pain or distress.”  If our mind doesn’t know the pain, we don’t suffer, hence laughing gas at the dentist office.

The human mind can suffer over very abstract subjects, such as not knowing one’s purpose, relationships that aren’t as we would hope them to be, regrets, not feeling clear about what path to take, not feeling connected to others in a fulfilling way, worry, feeling powerless, not knowing what the future will bring, feeling stuck or stagnant in our life.  Suffering takes the emotional forms of anxiety, unhappiness, tension, inner-conflict, fear, grief and depression.

“A cold in the head causes less suffering than an idea.”          Jules Renard

Everyone I work with as a clairvoyant desires relief from some level of suffering.  Externally it may look like the suffering is an experience of the physical body, like it is being caused by someone in their lives, some condition they must tolerate or the lack of an answer to an elusive question. But the real source of suffering is what the mind does with the emotions these physical and circumstantial experiences evoke.  To relieve suffering we must go to its source, the belief system.

When we love someone and can’t be with them because either they don’t feel the same about us or circumstances keep us a part, our heart feels broken, disappointed and longs for the connection of their company.  It is our belief about it that causes us suffering. Usually it’s something like our life will not be as good without this particular person or we will never feel love again.  Our mind notices that pain and wants relief.  It may seek relief through the company of another lover, a bottle of wine or self-critical thoughts that shut down the feelings. 

The intuitive mind senses and responds to emotions while the analytical mind calculates questions and tries to “figure them out.”  When we can’t figure it out we suffer.  The analytical mind spins and we have no place to go but the sense that something is wrong because we can’t see a solution that relieves our pain.  The analytical mind processes the painful emotions and physical sensations seeking relief in the form of an answer.  If there is no formula to make our pain go away, which is the case with emotional distress, the mind suffers over its own suffering, compounding the sensation that something is wrong.

Our subconscious beliefs about what to expect from our experiences, other people or life in general, live in our blind spot and create the greatest suffering.  Some are inherited in our DNA, others are acquired from experiences. All are written in the book of our soul, the Akashic records

To release the mind from suffering we must shift false and outdated beliefs. This goes beyond psychology to soul level transformation.  It often requires the help of someone who can see and heal our subconscious blind spot.  What we can do for ourselves is practice stilling the analytical mind through meditation or intentional body movement (yoga, walking outdoors, dance, breath work etc).  Stopping the mind from its obsessive search for answers to emotional experiences provides healthy relief of our suffering.  When we meditate regularly it breaks the cycle of unproductive mental activity, setting us free and bringing greater peace.

Snowboarding and skiing exercise the same muscles we use to access our intuition.  Here are five ways that they can contribute clarity to other areas of your life:   

1) Align with Your YES

Flying downhill at high speed with gravity as your motor, split second decisions are your power.  Every turn, every choice of direction is an inner yes that aligns you with the mountain and puts a smile on your face.  When your choices align with your yes they bring pleasure.  Your intuition is validated and responds by informing you with increasing speed and accuracy.

2) Wipeout Prevention

To survive and stay injury free skiing you must pay attention and be present in the moment.  The consequence of having your mind on anything but what you are doing is painful. The same is true when acting on your inner-guidance.  Being distracted muddles your perception, often with painful results.

3) Give Your Analyzer a Break

Snowboarding connects you with your inner child.  As a kid you didn’t spend so much time analyzing life. You were curious, playful and stuck your tongue out to taste the falling snow.   Trusting your intuition requires that you approach life with child like openness to non-linear answers.

4) Read Your Surroundings

Navigation of the slopes includes maintaining awareness of the skiers around you.  A portion of your consciousness is engaged in quickly reading what those in your path will do next to prevent collision.  Your intuitive guidance is meant to help you navigate life through perception of how those around you are behaving. Then direct your life in a way that stays on course and avoids negative impact.

5) Move Forward in Whiteout Conditions

When there’s poor visibility, flat light or blizzard conditions, the way to stay injury free is to relax your body, trust its perception and response to the terrain.  If you try to be in physical control rather than flow, your body will be stiff when you hit a bump, launching you in an unintended direction.  When you strain to see what is not ready to be seen you meet whiteout conditions.  Relaxation of control is required for supportive information to flow.

So get out there and rip it up! Your body and soul will thank you.

Bisbee at the ranch

Sometimes my mind gets caught up in a question that I don’t have the answer for, it circles and circles the question seeking relief.  As I was driving to Arizona from Colorado a couple of weeks ago, I had a lot of time to ponder a question that was stumping me.  While struggling to find the answer, I became aware of my unconscious belief that God had the right answer and wanted me to act in accordance with it.  I could not see past whatever blocks were in my mind to a clear choice for myself.  I started to get frustrated.

At this point of frustration, I was reminded of something I’d seen my dog Bisbee do shortly after I adopted him as a two-year old.  He’s a border collie programmed through generations of breeding to herd.  He wants to roundup everything that moves, to keep it in control so he can feel at peace.  On several of Bisbee’s first trips in a car he got manic about herding the cars that were driving by.  He wanted to chase them so bad that more than once he wedged himself between the driver’s seat and the door with his nose firmly pressed in the crack of the dashboard and windshield, every muscle in his body rigid.  I felt like Bisbee in my desire to have an answer to the question.  My analytical mind was locked into the belief that there was a right answer with intense focus on trying to figure it out.  I experienced the sensation of being pressed into a corner.  I wasn’t getting anywhere.  Finally, it dawned on me that there was no right answer.  This question I was asking was really not about right or wrong, good or bad, but simply a choice regarding what I wanted to create with my life.  The Universe or God didn’t really care whether I went this way or that.  Either path would result in a set of experiences that would be my life.

As I drove through the wide open blue skies of New Mexico, I remembered the words of my spiritual mentor, Dawn Eagle Woman “hold a spacious field.” I started visualizing an expansive amount of space around my question and the people that would be impacted by my choice.  I looked from horizon to horizon, consciously offering the question and each person involved as much room as I could physically see in the sky.  An expansiveness that wasn’t attached to an answer but simply let the question exist. 

When the analytical mind kicks in to respond to questions of the heart, it can push us into a corner and imprison us with the effort of trying to figure it out when there is no right answer.  We may choose to act based on our vision of the life we are interested in experiencing or wait for the moment when we encounter an option that we easily respond to with yes.  Engaging the mind in these situations is simply trying to control the unknown, a fruitless endeavor.  Our intuition is present to guide us in questions of the heart and teach us the gentler path of freedom and trust in the natural flow.

Wholeheartedness

Natalie —  November 22, 2010 — Leave a comment

This video message on wholeheartedness, presented by Brené Brown, contains precious information regarding our human experience.  Proof that vulnerability or purposeful risk taking such as letting ourselves be “seen” authentically is the key to a peaceful existence from within!

In today’s world the analytical mind is king while trusting intuition is judged as emotional and subjective.   This cerebral approach to life attempts to figure things out and feel in control.  Recent natural and man-made disasters have drawn to our attention the reality that humans do not have control over planet Earth.  We can forecast the weather and volcanic eruptions, build dykes to protect us from tidal changes and use science to perform feats such as drilling for oil at great depths of the ocean, but this does not put us in control of the forces of nature.  As long as we are not personally impacted by a hurricane, tornado, earthquake or tsunami we are able to live in denial, believing that technology will save us from the realities of our environment.  Our belief in science has distracted us from true intuitive power that comes with alignment to the vibration of the Earth.

The human body is amazing in its capacity to understand and process an exceptional quantity of data.   We have unintentionally detached from our primal-sensory nature through educational programming that validates the analytical mind combined with the many conveniences science and technology provide.  Opportunities to touch the Earth and feel its pulse are not part of our daily lifestyle.  Because of this we’ve lost contact with a facet of our intuitive capacity, experiencing a sense of separation from Mother Nature.  When we take time to be in non-manmade environments we increase our access to inner guidance.  A hike, mountain bike ride or work in the garden, saturate the visual auditory and sensory facilities with a neutral form of energy.  Nature is chaotic and extremely organized in a material as well as spiritual sense.  This reminds us of the invisible aspects of our Self. 

By immersing in the Earth’s vibration we tune-in to a primal side of our human nature.  The aspect of our energy that can sense when lightening is about to strike, as the hair on our arms stands on end.  In the city we are swallowed up in a stream of news, whether it is fact, fiction or entertainment, it draws our attention away from our inner guidance.  It keeps our focus pointed externally rather than internally.  Mother Nature is the ultimate cleanser of psychic space.  Her wild wide-open spaces download the information inundation that has clogged our receptors with predominantly useless data.  The simple act of being in nature, regardless of the activity or inactivity of our body, can be an intentional form of meditation.  When we see a hawk, daisy or the bark on an aspen tree we presence ourselves to beauty, resilience and simplicity. 

The fire hose of data constantly inundating our life can be exhausting and overwhelming.  It makes us want to crawl back into our shell, tune-out, take a break.  The most vibrant place to take that break is in Mother Nature.  Connection to the Earth’s vibration helps us align to the part of ourselves that is chronically being overridden by an analytical minded environment.  Mother Nature offers us a healing of sensory overload and provides clearer access to our inner guidance.  Let us receive her gift.